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Latest 7 Posts
Amazon S3 vs. Amazon Glacier: a simple backup strategy in the cloud
Mon, Mar 9th 2015 18
Architecting on AWS – design for graceful service degradation
Wed, Feb 4th 2015 12
Architecting on AWS: Optimising the application design
Mon, Dec 22nd 2014 17
Architecting on AWS: Dynamic configuration vs master AMIs
Mon, Dec 8th 2014 10
Architecting on AWS: utilising elastic compute
Tue, Nov 25th 2014 14
Architecting on AWS: the best services to build a two-tier application
Tue, Nov 18th 2014 13
Hadoop streaming R on Hortonworks Windows distribution
Tue, May 6th 2014 14
Top 10
Amazon S3 vs. Amazon Glacier: a simple backup strategy in the cloud
Mon, Mar 9th 2015 18
Architecting on AWS: Optimising the application design
Mon, Dec 22nd 2014 17
Hadoop streaming R on Hortonworks Windows distribution
Tue, May 6th 2014 14
Architecting on AWS: utilising elastic compute
Tue, Nov 25th 2014 14
Architecting on AWS: the best services to build a two-tier application
Tue, Nov 18th 2014 13
Architecting on AWS – design for graceful service degradation
Wed, Feb 4th 2015 12
Architecting on AWS: Dynamic configuration vs master AMIs
Mon, Dec 8th 2014 10




Recent Blog Posts
18
Amazon S3 vs. Amazon Glacier: a simple backup strategy in the cloud
Mon, Mar 9th 2015 3:08a   Christian Petters
When you start out to design your first application for the hosting on AWS (Amazon Web Services) you will eventually end up considering your options for the protection of your and your customers’ data against accidental losses. While you may have designed a highly resilient and durable solution, this does not necessarily protected you from administrative mishaps, data corruption or malicious attacks against your system. This can only be mitigated with an effective backup strategy. Thanks
12
Architecting on AWS – design for graceful service degradation
Wed, Feb 4th 2015 2:44a   Christian Petters
Throughout our series of posts we have already seen a variety of architectural patterns that allow us to design scalable and resilient solutions in using the capabilities provided to us by Amazon Web Services (AWS). However, even the best design can have flaws and may show signs of bottlenecks over time or as the demand on your application increases. This could be caused by additional load created by an influx of additional customers using your application or an increasing amount of data that ne
17
Architecting on AWS: Optimising the application design
Mon, Dec 22nd 2014 1:05p   Christian Petters
In our practice we hear a variety of misconceptions and misinterpretations in relation to the benefits of moving workloads ‘into the cloud’. You should be very vary if someone wants to make you believe that the pure migration of a traditional application to a cloud services vendor will make it any more scalable or reliable. Of course, you can scale vertically in increasing the size of your compute nodes. However, this still restricts you to the maximum size of instances available. Scaling ho
10
Architecting on AWS: Dynamic configuration vs master AMIs
Mon, Dec 8th 2014 9:25p   Christian Petters
Infrastructure as a Service holds the promise of reduced costs and increased flexibility that is enabled through ease of operation and management. To seize that opportunity as IT professionals when we are architecting on AWS though, we need to adapt how we view, manage and operate today’s technology. The desire to respond more agile to changing business needs and the ever increasing pace in innovation has helped to form the DevOps service delivery model where the development and operations
14
Architecting on AWS: utilising elastic compute
Tue, Nov 25th 2014 10:05a   Christian Petters
Our last post in this series has provided you with an overview of our example architecture on AWS. In this post we are going into some more detail in focusing on elasticity using AWS EC2 (Elastic Compute Cloud), and in particular we will see how to use AutoScaling to make your computing infraastructure elastic and highly available. But what is that elasticity thing that people keep on going on about? According to Wikipedia elasticity is defined as “the degree to which a system is able to adapt
13
Architecting on AWS: the best services to build a two-tier application
Tue, Nov 18th 2014 10:05a   Christian Petters
The notion of a scalable, on-demand, pay-as-you go cloud infrastructure tends to be easy understood by the majority of today’s IT specialists. However, in order to fully reap the benefits from hosting solutions in the cloud you will have to rethink traditional ‘on-premises’ design approaches. This should happen for a variety of reasons with the most prominent ones the design-for-costs or the adoption of a design-for-failure approach. This is the first of a series of posts in which we will




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