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TIP - How to navigate quickly through Scientific American archives
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An essay on The Joy of Typing
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I don’t like most modern computer keyboards. My career at IBM using their excellent keyboards with the superb “buckling spring” technology has made every other type of keyboard seem inferior to me. There is that immensely satisfying “Click” every time you successfully make a keystroke, you just can’t beat it.

During the mid-1990s I switched to a Lexmark keyboard, not as massive as the weighty IBM ones, also having the buckling spring mechanism, with the added advantage of taking up less desktop space. This Lexmark gathered much gunk between/under the keys, so a few months ago I pulled off the removable keytops and gave it a thorough cleaning.

Trouble was, I couldn’t ever get the space bar to work properly after that. Now it randomly generates extra spaces between words causing me much frustration and time wasted remove the surplus spaces.

I explored the purchase of a brand new Unicomp keyboard from the USA. I’m sure their keyboards are excellent to use, with the slight advantage of having a “Windows” key which neither the old IBM or Lexmark keyboards did (they were designed well before Windows 95 appeared). They cost from USD $79.00 upwards, however the freight across the Pacific to Australia was going to double the price, so I passed on this option.

So now I’m back using an original IBM “Model M” keyboard again, and must say that it does seem to have a subtly better tactile feel than the Lexmark. So I’m a happy typist again (in keyboard terms, that is).

image
The IBM Model M keyboard

Interestingly, and in a completely different vein, the other day I came across The Joy of Typing by Clive Thompson, wit the subtitle “How racing along at 60 words a minute can unlock your mind.”

He starts of by posing the question: “How racing along at 60 words a minute can unlock your mind.” A study had reported that college students who typed lecture notes remembered less than those who wrote them down by hand.

So, should we stop typing in favour of handwriting (where possible)? Go read Clive Thompson’s article and draw your own conclusions.



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http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NotesToneUnturned/~3/3rcOZQlUAq4/an-essay-on-joy-of-typing.html
Jun 27, 2014
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Recent Blog Posts
77
TIP - How to navigate quickly through Scientific American archives
Fri, Apr 21st 2017 3:40a   Tony Austin
For subscribers to Scientific American, see How to navigate quickly through Scientific American archives or read below. Subscribers to Scientific American are given access to every issue, in PDF format, right back to the magazine's launch in 1845. Wow! It can be quite a laborious, hit and miss process to navigate back through all those issues, particularly for the earlier years (prior to November 1921) where there are about fifty issues per year. Originally there was an issue per week, then in
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Firefox browser is stuck since 2006 at file version 4.42.0.0 – Why so?
Thu, Apr 20th 2017 3:45a   Tony Austin
I have saved quite a range of Firefox installers, and there’s something that puzzles me about them Let’s start with Firefox release 1.0.3 which is indicated to be File Version 3.12.0.0 as follows: My understanding of “file version” is that the developer is supposed to register each file with a unique number that truly represents the release number, as happens with RoboForm 8.3.3 (its latest version at the time of writing): With many products, the external  “release” number and
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Combo BBQ and Drinks Cooler
Sun, Mar 12th 2017 1:15p   Tony Austin
            BBQ and Drinks Cooler   When you are finished, just turn the handle and it extinguishes out the fire. Not sure who came up with this nifty idea, but don't you wish that you were this clever?Purchase a copy of NotesTracker for all your IBM Lotus Notes/Domino application compliance and usage tracking needs
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TIP – Add Safe Mode to the Boot Menu of Windows 10 (and 8)
Wed, Feb 22nd 2017 12:45a   Tony Austin
Recently I had a PBSOD (pale blue screen of death) crash with one of my Windows 10 systems, and kept getting crashes within minutes every time after rebooting the system. Somewhat annoyingly, starting with Windows 8 Microsoft removed the old boot menu options that we were used to with Windows 7 and previous versions. Run a search like this to see the complaints about this from the Windows user community. It’s not a bad idea to modify the Windows boot settings in order to get back to the old bo
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Informed consent, software-wise -- or software-dumb?
Sun, Feb 12th 2017 3:16a   Tony Austin
This is an update to a post originally published way back on 11 January 2010. Unfortunately, the industry of creating stupid software still is thriving in 2017. You should learn something new each and every day of your life, so I keep reminding my young grandsons. It’s a maxim that I still follow myself, in a desperate bid to keep my brain alert and defer that day when my grey matter finally degenerates into a useless pile of wobbly jelly. As an example, this morning for the first time I came
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Cricket can be a deadly game
Tue, Nov 22nd 2016 12:15p   Tony Austin
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This is real online shopping!
Thu, Nov 10th 2016 11:15a   Tony Austin
  Notice the shine on the rails?Purchase a copy of NotesTracker for all your IBM Lotus Notes/Domino application compliance and usage tracking needs
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Thu, Oct 20th 2016 9:40a   Tony Austin
Congratulations to the folk at Zuver Hosting for providing a service that is so fast and reliable that I’m getting oh so bored with receiving weekly performance reports like the one in the following screenshot: Since November 2014 I’ve experienced the same boringly good performance and reliability, week after week, and all for such a low monthly rate. Note that I’m not at all saying that there aren’t any equally good Australian web hosting companies, some of which I used previously, jus
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Brain stretch
Mon, Oct 17th 2016 9:31a   Tony Austin
Here’s a reminder of our place in the grand scheme of things. The above movie was generated using the iOS App "Cosmic Eye", written by Danail Obreschkow at the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research at the University of Western Australia. Watch for the quarks making the briefest of appearances in the atomic nucleus. There are older versions of this “cosmic zoom” approach, such as this one created by the Film Board of Canada: Enough of the easy-peasy visual stuff. A new rese
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You just can’t get through to some people
Wed, Oct 12th 2016 9:16p   Tony Austin
I was browsing for Java programming books yesterday, and came across this one: URL: http://www.worldofbooks.com.au/catalog/product/view/id/4152420/ Notice the asking price?  $1,421.99 (Australian dollars) The same book (Introduction to Java Programming: Comprehensive Version by Y. Daniel Liang) at other sites such as Amazon was – depending on the edition and type (hardcover or paperback) and whether new or used – going for anything from around $20 to $240. I thought that I’d warn the




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